Skip Dinner, Have A Big Dessert

Randomosity of psychological noise.
Despite being in Singapore and all.

askthatkidpirate:

I don’t want to talk about it.
(OOC: Edited because I forgot his tats)

askthatkidpirate:

I don’t want to talk about it.

(OOC: Edited because I forgot his tats)

(via parisaur)

: creepy ted bundy quotes

alexandralovell:

1. “Well-meaning, decent people will condemn the behavior of a Ted Bundy, while they’re walking past a magazine rack full of the very kinds of things that send young kids down the road to be Ted Bundys.”

2. “I don’t feel guilty for anything. I feel sorry for people who feel guilt.”

3. “What’s…

ramirez-dahmer-bundy:

Mary Bell
Bell’s mother Betty was a prostitute who was often absent from the  family home, travelling to Glasgow to work. Mary was her first child,  born when Betty was sixteen years old. It is not known who Mary’s  biological father was; for most of her life she believed it to be Billy  Bell, an habitual criminal later arrested for armed robbery who had  married Betty some time after Mary was born. Independent accounts from  family members suggest strongly that Betty had attempted to kill Mary  and make her death look accidental more than once during the first few  years of her life. Mary herself says she was subject to repeated sexual  abuse, her mother forcing her to engage in sex acts with men from the  age of five.
Bell grew up in the Scotswood area of Newcastle, an economically  depressed area where domestic violence and criminal behaviour was  commonplace. As a result, her previous crimes, including attacks on  other children at school, vandalism, and theft did not attract undue  attention. She had also developed a reputation as a showoff, so her  proclamation, “I am a murderer”, was dismissed as just another one of  her idle boasts.
Mary Bell was convicted of strangling toddler Martin Brown on May 25,  1968, when she was 10 years old. She was, as far as anyone knows, alone  on this occasion. Between that time and the second murder, she and her  friend Norma Bell (no relation) broke into and vandalised a Nursery in  Scotswood, leaving notes that claimed responsibility for the Brown  murder. The Newcastle Police dismissed the incident as a prank typical  of the populace of the area.
On July 31, 1968, the two took part in the death, again by  strangulation, of three-year-old Brian Howe. Police reports concluded  that Mary Bell had gone back after killing him to carve an “M” in his  stomach with a razor, as well as use scissors to cut off bits of his  hair and scrape part of his genitals. As the girls were so young and  their testimony contradicted each other, it has never been entirely  clear which of the two did what. Martin Brown’s death was initially  ruled an accident as there was no evidence of foul play. Eventually, his  death was linked with Brian Howe’s murder and in August, the two girls  were charged with two counts of murder.
Mary Bell was convicted of manslaughter on December 17th, 1968. She  was found guilty not of murder, but of “manslaughter due to diminished  responsibility,” the jury taking their lead from her diagnosis by  court-appointed psychiatrists who described her as displaying “classic  symptoms of psychopathology”. She was sentenced to be “detained at Her  Majesty’s Pleasure,” effectively an indefinite sentence of imprisonment.  Norma Bell was found not guilty on both charges.
From the time of her conviction onward, Bell was the focus of a great  deal of attention from the British press and also from the German Stern  Magazine. Her mother repeatedly sold stories about her to the press and  often gave reporters writings she claimed to be Mary’s. Bell herself  made headlines when in September 1977, she briefly escaped from the  custody of Moore Court open prison.
Bell was released from prison in 1980 and was granted anonymity to  start a new life (under an assumed name) with her daughter. This  daughter did not know of her mother’s past until Bell’s location was  discovered by reporters. The daughter’s anonymity was originally  protected until she reached the age of 18. However, on May 21, 2003,  Bell won a High Court battle to have her anonymity and that of her  daughter extended for life.
She is the subject of two books by Gitta Sereny; The Case of Mary  Bell, 1972, an account of the murders and trial, and Cries Unheard: the  Story of Mary Bell, an in-depth biography based on interviews with Bell,  as well as relatives, friends and professionals who knew her during and  after her imprisonment. This second book was the first to detail Bell’s  account of sexual abuse by her mother and her mother’s clients.
The publication of Cries Unheard was controversial because Bell  received payment for her agreement to take part. The payment was  criticised by the tabloid press, and the Blair government attempted to  find a legal means to prevent its publication on the grounds that a  criminal should not profit from his or her crimes, but were  unsuccessful. In a 1999 debate in the House of Lords, Lord Wakeham  stated “the public interest oozes from every pore of the book”.

ramirez-dahmer-bundy:

Mary Bell

Bell’s mother Betty was a prostitute who was often absent from the family home, travelling to Glasgow to work. Mary was her first child, born when Betty was sixteen years old. It is not known who Mary’s biological father was; for most of her life she believed it to be Billy Bell, an habitual criminal later arrested for armed robbery who had married Betty some time after Mary was born. Independent accounts from family members suggest strongly that Betty had attempted to kill Mary and make her death look accidental more than once during the first few years of her life. Mary herself says she was subject to repeated sexual abuse, her mother forcing her to engage in sex acts with men from the age of five.

Bell grew up in the Scotswood area of Newcastle, an economically depressed area where domestic violence and criminal behaviour was commonplace. As a result, her previous crimes, including attacks on other children at school, vandalism, and theft did not attract undue attention. She had also developed a reputation as a showoff, so her proclamation, “I am a murderer”, was dismissed as just another one of her idle boasts.

Mary Bell was convicted of strangling toddler Martin Brown on May 25, 1968, when she was 10 years old. She was, as far as anyone knows, alone on this occasion. Between that time and the second murder, she and her friend Norma Bell (no relation) broke into and vandalised a Nursery in Scotswood, leaving notes that claimed responsibility for the Brown murder. The Newcastle Police dismissed the incident as a prank typical of the populace of the area.

On July 31, 1968, the two took part in the death, again by strangulation, of three-year-old Brian Howe. Police reports concluded that Mary Bell had gone back after killing him to carve an “M” in his stomach with a razor, as well as use scissors to cut off bits of his hair and scrape part of his genitals. As the girls were so young and their testimony contradicted each other, it has never been entirely clear which of the two did what. Martin Brown’s death was initially ruled an accident as there was no evidence of foul play. Eventually, his death was linked with Brian Howe’s murder and in August, the two girls were charged with two counts of murder.

Mary Bell was convicted of manslaughter on December 17th, 1968. She was found guilty not of murder, but of “manslaughter due to diminished responsibility,” the jury taking their lead from her diagnosis by court-appointed psychiatrists who described her as displaying “classic symptoms of psychopathology”. She was sentenced to be “detained at Her Majesty’s Pleasure,” effectively an indefinite sentence of imprisonment. Norma Bell was found not guilty on both charges.

From the time of her conviction onward, Bell was the focus of a great deal of attention from the British press and also from the German Stern Magazine. Her mother repeatedly sold stories about her to the press and often gave reporters writings she claimed to be Mary’s. Bell herself made headlines when in September 1977, she briefly escaped from the custody of Moore Court open prison.

Bell was released from prison in 1980 and was granted anonymity to start a new life (under an assumed name) with her daughter. This daughter did not know of her mother’s past until Bell’s location was discovered by reporters. The daughter’s anonymity was originally protected until she reached the age of 18. However, on May 21, 2003, Bell won a High Court battle to have her anonymity and that of her daughter extended for life.

She is the subject of two books by Gitta Sereny; The Case of Mary Bell, 1972, an account of the murders and trial, and Cries Unheard: the Story of Mary Bell, an in-depth biography based on interviews with Bell, as well as relatives, friends and professionals who knew her during and after her imprisonment. This second book was the first to detail Bell’s account of sexual abuse by her mother and her mother’s clients.

The publication of Cries Unheard was controversial because Bell received payment for her agreement to take part. The payment was criticised by the tabloid press, and the Blair government attempted to find a legal means to prevent its publication on the grounds that a criminal should not profit from his or her crimes, but were unsuccessful. In a 1999 debate in the House of Lords, Lord Wakeham stated “the public interest oozes from every pore of the book”.

ramirez-dahmer-bundy:

Mary Bell
Her name was Mary Bell, a wickedly intelligent,  manipulative, cold little girl with dazzling blue eyes and dark, short  hair. Mary was one to tell ‘tall tales’, according to school teachers  who knew her, and she was also one to kill. More than once, and  completely, unbashedley without remorse.
The summer of 1968 saw the disappearance of two  toddlers. Bordering the town was a railroad, an abandoned home, and an  old construction site. Normally places where the children played, they  would also figure in to the deaths of Brian Howe, 3, and Martin Brown.
Early in August, Mary Bell and her friend Norma Bell,  (the girls were not related,) offered to help Brian Howe’s sister Pat  search for the boy, who had not come from being out playing. Pat  accepted the girls’ offer, and they set off to look.
The whole while, Mary and Norma led Pat on a fruitless  search through the usual places children played. Finally they found  themselves in the town’s broken-down industrial area, and a series of  huge concrete blocks that children were warned never to play on.
At a loss, Mary surmised that ‘he might be playing  behind the blocks, or between them.’ Norma countered that little boys,  even those as young as Brian, knew better. The industrial area and the  railroad tracks were a dangerous place to play. With no Brian safely in  tow, Pat Howe, Mary, and Norma went home and notified the police.
The Newcastle Police Department pulled Brian Howe’s  body from between the stone blocks at 11:00 p.m. that night. He had been  strangled, puncture wounds were dotting his thighs, his hair had been  cut, and, worst of all, his penis had been partially skinned. When  authorities removed his clothing they found the letter ‘M’ cut into his  stomach, which may have been inflicted with the broken scissors found  lying nearby. Parents and children panicked.
Police invaded the town, and immeadiately found Mary  and Norma Bell suspicious. They were reported to have been smiling the  entire time, as if it were all ‘a huge joke’. Even more alarming and  creepy, detectives noticed bizarre reactions to the funeral on Mary  Bell’s behalf. When the coffin was carried from the Howe’s home, she  merely rubbed her hands together and laughed, delighted at the  spectacle.
Sadly, Brian Howe was the second child who had died at Mary’s small  hands. In May 1968, young Martin Brown disappeared while playing, and  was found on May 25th, dead inside an abandoned house on the outskirts  of Scotswood. The police, with no leads, declared the cause of the boy’s  death as ‘open’.
Mary had been a time bomb, it seemed, even before she  culminated her actions into murder. On May 11th, a young boy was found  outside a pub bleeding from a head wound. Mary Bell, who had asked  before, “When you choke someone, do they die?”, told adults that the boy  had fallen from a ledge. In reality, it was later discovered, she had  pushed him.
On May 15th, four days after attempting to kill the  young boy, Mary choked two playmates in the playground at Day Nursery in  Woodlands Crescent, what we call an elementary school. Ten days later,  she took Martin Brown’s life.
Regarded as a loudmouth and a girl who loved to brag,  Mary and her friend Norma would visit Martin’s aunt’s home and grill  her. She has stated that the girls asked her, “Do you miss him? Do you  cry for him? Does June [Martin’s mother] miss him?” Eventually, repulsed  by their gleefulness, she orderered them never to come back.
Two days following Martin’s murder, the Day Nursery  was broken into. With all the characteristics of adult killers, Mary and  Norma scrawled cryptic, frightening notes on the walls and tore the  school apart, ransacking everything inside. Scrawled on the walls in  their childish handwriting were these words: (Errors have been corrected  by me for ease in reading.)
 “I murder so that I may come back. Fuck off, we  murder. Watch out, Fanny and Faggot.”  (Fanny was alledgedley Norma’s  alias, Faggot was Mary’s.)
 “We did murder Martin. Fuck off you bastard.”
After her capture, Mary passed off the writings as something they did ‘for a giggle’. 
Luckily, before Mary Bell could kill again, she was  apprehended by shocked police, disgusted that such a small child could  act with such relentless evil. She is said to have told attorneys, “I  like hurting little things that can’t fight back.” 
As if her own proud admission to the crimes wasn’t  enough, gray fibers from Mary’s clothing were found on the bodies of  both Brian Howe and Martin Brown. The trial, a media frenzy for its day,  lasted nine days. It culminated in the jury find Norma guilty of the  breaking and entering of Day Nursery, and Mary guilty of manslaughter by  diminished responsibility, due to her age. Norma was given probation.  Mary was given detention for life.
Finally, the little girl cried.
She was placed in a boy’s home, since prison was not  deemed appropriate, and she was considered far too dangerous for a home  for troubled girls. At age 23 she was set free, and after living with  her mother for some time, becoming addicted to drugs, and spending time  in intensive therapy, Mary Bell became a mother herself. She is  currently living free and clear, with no supervision.
When asked about her crimes, she is reluctant to  assume responsibility. Recently she and her family were driven from  their home when villagers learned of her identity. Signs were posted  screaming “Murderer Out!”, and, with blankets covering their faces, she  and her family escaped a mob not unlike the final scene in Frankenstein, where the enraged villagers drive the monster from their home.
In a twist only this horror story could have, it was  then that Mary Bell’s daughter discovered that her own mother was the  Mary Bell of British history, the child killer who was but a child  herself.

She reminds of Esther from that Orphan movie. *shivers* I don’t think she should have been set free at all. It’s not manslaughter, it’s not forced by any particular circumstances. These two girls did it out of pure spite and were so gleeful about it even. To commit a pre-meditated murder is beyond a normal child’s mind. These two aren’t children; they are monsters in human skins.
Whatever happened to Norma Bell?

ramirez-dahmer-bundy:

Mary Bell

Her name was Mary Bell, a wickedly intelligent, manipulative, cold little girl with dazzling blue eyes and dark, short hair. Mary was one to tell ‘tall tales’, according to school teachers who knew her, and she was also one to kill. More than once, and completely, unbashedley without remorse.

The summer of 1968 saw the disappearance of two toddlers. Bordering the town was a railroad, an abandoned home, and an old construction site. Normally places where the children played, they would also figure in to the deaths of Brian Howe, 3, and Martin Brown.

Early in August, Mary Bell and her friend Norma Bell, (the girls were not related,) offered to help Brian Howe’s sister Pat search for the boy, who had not come from being out playing. Pat accepted the girls’ offer, and they set off to look.

The whole while, Mary and Norma led Pat on a fruitless search through the usual places children played. Finally they found themselves in the town’s broken-down industrial area, and a series of huge concrete blocks that children were warned never to play on.

At a loss, Mary surmised that ‘he might be playing behind the blocks, or between them.’ Norma countered that little boys, even those as young as Brian, knew better. The industrial area and the railroad tracks were a dangerous place to play. With no Brian safely in tow, Pat Howe, Mary, and Norma went home and notified the police.

The Newcastle Police Department pulled Brian Howe’s body from between the stone blocks at 11:00 p.m. that night. He had been strangled, puncture wounds were dotting his thighs, his hair had been cut, and, worst of all, his penis had been partially skinned. When authorities removed his clothing they found the letter ‘M’ cut into his stomach, which may have been inflicted with the broken scissors found lying nearby. Parents and children panicked.

Police invaded the town, and immeadiately found Mary and Norma Bell suspicious. They were reported to have been smiling the entire time, as if it were all ‘a huge joke’. Even more alarming and creepy, detectives noticed bizarre reactions to the funeral on Mary Bell’s behalf. When the coffin was carried from the Howe’s home, she merely rubbed her hands together and laughed, delighted at the spectacle.

Sadly, Brian Howe was the second child who had died at Mary’s small hands. In May 1968, young Martin Brown disappeared while playing, and was found on May 25th, dead inside an abandoned house on the outskirts of Scotswood. The police, with no leads, declared the cause of the boy’s death as ‘open’.

Mary had been a time bomb, it seemed, even before she culminated her actions into murder. On May 11th, a young boy was found outside a pub bleeding from a head wound. Mary Bell, who had asked before, “When you choke someone, do they die?”, told adults that the boy had fallen from a ledge. In reality, it was later discovered, she had pushed him.

On May 15th, four days after attempting to kill the young boy, Mary choked two playmates in the playground at Day Nursery in Woodlands Crescent, what we call an elementary school. Ten days later, she took Martin Brown’s life.

Regarded as a loudmouth and a girl who loved to brag, Mary and her friend Norma would visit Martin’s aunt’s home and grill her. She has stated that the girls asked her, “Do you miss him? Do you cry for him? Does June [Martin’s mother] miss him?” Eventually, repulsed by their gleefulness, she orderered them never to come back.

Two days following Martin’s murder, the Day Nursery was broken into. With all the characteristics of adult killers, Mary and Norma scrawled cryptic, frightening notes on the walls and tore the school apart, ransacking everything inside. Scrawled on the walls in their childish handwriting were these words: (Errors have been corrected by me for ease in reading.)

“I murder so that I may come back. Fuck off, we murder. Watch out, Fanny and Faggot.” (Fanny was alledgedley Norma’s alias, Faggot was Mary’s.)

“We did murder Martin. Fuck off you bastard.”

After her capture, Mary passed off the writings as something they did ‘for a giggle’.

Luckily, before Mary Bell could kill again, she was apprehended by shocked police, disgusted that such a small child could act with such relentless evil. She is said to have told attorneys, “I like hurting little things that can’t fight back.”

As if her own proud admission to the crimes wasn’t enough, gray fibers from Mary’s clothing were found on the bodies of both Brian Howe and Martin Brown. The trial, a media frenzy for its day, lasted nine days. It culminated in the jury find Norma guilty of the breaking and entering of Day Nursery, and Mary guilty of manslaughter by diminished responsibility, due to her age. Norma was given probation. Mary was given detention for life.

Finally, the little girl cried.

She was placed in a boy’s home, since prison was not deemed appropriate, and she was considered far too dangerous for a home for troubled girls. At age 23 she was set free, and after living with her mother for some time, becoming addicted to drugs, and spending time in intensive therapy, Mary Bell became a mother herself. She is currently living free and clear, with no supervision.

When asked about her crimes, she is reluctant to assume responsibility. Recently she and her family were driven from their home when villagers learned of her identity. Signs were posted screaming “Murderer Out!”, and, with blankets covering their faces, she and her family escaped a mob not unlike the final scene in Frankenstein, where the enraged villagers drive the monster from their home.

In a twist only this horror story could have, it was then that Mary Bell’s daughter discovered that her own mother was the Mary Bell of British history, the child killer who was but a child herself.

She reminds of Esther from that Orphan movie. *shivers* I don’t think she should have been set free at all. It’s not manslaughter, it’s not forced by any particular circumstances. These two girls did it out of pure spite and were so gleeful about it even. To commit a pre-meditated murder is beyond a normal child’s mind. These two aren’t children; they are monsters in human skins.

Whatever happened to Norma Bell?

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